History

  • Why were people in the Early Middle Ages reopening graves?
    by Medievalists.net on June 21, 2021 at 6:09 pm

    In early medieval Europe, the dead and their possessions did not stop being important after the burial – researchers have discovered a widespread tradition of reopening graves. […]

  • Symposia and drunken women
    by Mary Harrsch on June 21, 2021 at 6:00 pm

    The Greek symposium was a key Hellenic social institution. It was a forum for men of respected families to debate, plot, boast, or simply to revel with others. They were frequently held to celebrate the introduction of young men into aristocratic society. Symposia were also held by aristocrats to celebrate other special occasions, such as victories in athletic and poetic contests. Symposia were usually held in the andrōn - the men's quarters of […]

  • Why Weren't These Black Death Victims Buried in Mass Graves?
    on June 21, 2021 at 4:51 pm

    New research suggests some Europeans who died of the bubonic plague were individually interred with car […]

  • Martha: A Remarkable Disciple
    by Michele Barasso on June 21, 2021 at 1:00 pm

    The New Testament mentions Martha, a disciple of Jesus, three times (Luke 10:38–42; John 11:1–44; 12:2). Her actions, statements, and profession of faith reveal a […] The post Martha: A Remarkable Disciple appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society. […]

  • The Power of Sunlight in Medieval Churches
    by Medievalists.net on June 20, 2021 at 6:39 pm

    Medieval churches have harnessed the power of sunlight to define and accentuate sacred spaces, as well as indicate holiness […]

  • Joshua in the Bible
    by Biblical Archaeology Society Staff on June 20, 2021 at 3:33 pm

    World-renowned author and Nobel Peace Prize winner Elie Wiesel reflects on the Biblical figure Joshua in a Supporting Roles column for Bible Review. The post Joshua in the Bible appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society. […]

  • In Search of the Once and Future King: A Continuing Quest
    by Medievalists.net on June 20, 2021 at 5:59 am

    In our final entry, we examine the case for Arthur’s historicity as well as the pertinacious campaign waged by scholars, amateur historians and enthusiasts to discover the real Arthur. […]

  • The Mongols’ Imperial Space: From Universalism to Glocalization
    by Medievalists.net on June 20, 2021 at 12:14 am

    This paper seeks to explain how the Mongol imperial space was created, organized, and conceived by the Mongols and their subjects in the various realms […]

  • Pompeii's Regio V: Vibrant gladiator frescos and proof of October eruption date
    by Mary Harrsch on June 19, 2021 at 6:04 pm

    This fresco of gladiatorial combat, unearthed in Pompeii in 2019, was found in a basement room of a building that scholars think was a tavern frequented by gladiators in the city.  The tavern was found not far from the gladiators' barracks in Regio V. The wounded Thraex, bleeding profusely from injuries on his wrist and chest, raises a finger to indicate his submission and request for mercy. The victorious Murmillo, wearing a plumed, […]

  • When Was Jesus Born—B.C. or A.D.?
    by Megan Sauter on June 19, 2021 at 3:35 pm

    In which year was Jesus born? While this is sometimes debated, the majority of New Testament scholars place Jesus’ birth in 4 B.C. or before. The post When Was Jesus Born—B.C. or A.D.? appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society. […]

  • Crowd behavior in imperial Rome and Constantinople, with Daniëlle Slootjes
    by Medievalists.net on June 18, 2021 at 4:00 pm

    As our own political world is increasingly revolving around mass protests, it is time to revisit what we know about the dynamics of crowds in imperial Roman cities, whether they acted for or against the regime of the day. […]

  • Mark and John: A Wedding at Cana—Whose and Where?
    by James Tabor on June 18, 2021 at 1:21 pm

    James Tabor discusses the wedding at Cana from the Gospels of Mark and John. Whose wedding was this and why were Jesus and his family present? The post Mark and John: A Wedding at Cana—Whose and Where? appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society. […]

  • A Simple Cotton Sack Tells an Intergenerational Story of Separation Under Slavery
    on June 18, 2021 at 10:30 am

    Historian Tiya Miles' new book traces the lives of three Black women through an embroidered family heirloom known as "Ashley's sack" […]

  • Juneteenth, the U.S.' Second Independence Day, Is Now a Federal Holiday
    on June 17, 2021 at 6:55 pm

    June 19, 1865, marked the end of slavery in Texas and, by extension, the Confederate states […]

  • Headless Statue of Ancient Woman Discovered in Turkey's 'Mother Goddess City'
    on June 17, 2021 at 6:32 pm

    The 1,800-year-old sculpture dates to Metropolis' Roman era […]

  • Theatres of War: Crusade, Colonialism and Chivalry in the Middle Ages
    by Medievalists.net on June 17, 2021 at 4:38 pm

    Were the Crusades an early example of European colonialism? What value did the crusading frontier hold for the knights who fought to defend it? What was the relationship between the Crusades and the knightly culture of chivalry? […]

  • Archaeological Forensics
    by Marek Dospěl on June 17, 2021 at 1:08 pm

    “Pottery-making was not a solitary affair; it was not limited to adults or highly experienced potters,” remarks Kent D. Fowler, Professor in the Department of […] The post Archaeological Forensics appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society. […]

  • Archaeological Forensics
    by Marek Dospěl on June 17, 2021 at 1:08 pm

    “Pottery-making was not a solitary affair; it was not limited to adults or highly experienced potters,” remarks Kent D. Fowler, Professor in the Department of […] The post Archaeological Forensics appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society. […]

  • The Horde with Marie Favereau
    by Medievalists.net on June 17, 2021 at 5:48 am

    This week on The Medieval Podcast, Danièle speaks with Marie Favereau about the myths and truths surrounding the Golden Horde, how nomadic people tend to be misunderstood, and how the Mongol people changed the world. […]

  • The Galloway Hoard Exhibit through September 12, 2021 at the National Museum of Scotland
    by Mary Harrsch on June 16, 2021 at 6:28 pm

    Discovered by a metal detectorist in Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland in 2014, the Galloway Hoard, buried around 900 CE, contains over 100 diverse objects, from silver, gold and jewelled treasures to rarely surviving textiles, including wool, linen and Scotland’s earliest examples of silk.   It is thought that the hoard was buried some time in the mid-ninth or tenth century, though it is not known why it was buried. The hoard consists of a […]

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