History

  • The Land of Salt?
    by Jonathan Laden on September 24, 2021 at 4:03 am

    A team from the University of Haifa identified dozens of salt production installations in the immediate vicinity of the coastal city near modern Haifa, many of which had been used and reused for hundreds of years, between 200 B.C.E and 1300 C.E. The post The Land of Salt? appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society. […]

  • The Land of Salt?
    by Jonathan Laden on September 24, 2021 at 4:03 am

    A team from the University of Haifa identified dozens of salt production installations in the immediate vicinity of the coastal city near modern Haifa, many of which had been used and reused for hundreds of years, between 200 B.C.E and 1300 C.E. The post The Land of Salt? appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society. […]

  • Pompeii Virtual Walk: Part 1 of the 4th 30-minute segment
    by Mary Harrsch on September 23, 2021 at 10:21 pm

    This segment of the Pompeii Virtual Walk video includes the House of the Dioscuri, the House of Adonis Wounded, the House of Meleager, the House of Apollo, one of the fortification towers, the House of the Small Fountain, the House of the Large Fountain, the House of the Anchor, and the Arch of Caligula. As stated before, I have used Topaz Sharpen AI to remove the slight motion blur in screen captures as well as Adobe Camera Raw to adjust […]

  • Inscription, “Jesus, son of Mary,” found in Jezreel
    by Jonathan Laden on September 23, 2021 at 10:02 pm

    A stone, engraved in Greek was found at el-Taiyiba in the Jezreel Valley in the Upper Galilee. It had originally been part of the lintel […] The post Inscription, “Jesus, son of Mary,” found in Jezreel appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society. […]

  • 16th century shield returned to the Czech Republic
    by Medievalists.net on September 23, 2021 at 7:19 pm

    A stunning decorative shield, made in the sixteenth century, is returning to the Czech Republic after being looted by the Nazis nearly eighty years ago.   […]

  • Herod the Great and the Herodian Family Tree
    by Biblical Archaeology Society Staff on September 23, 2021 at 3:39 pm

    See a visualization of the Herodian family tree and key events in the New Testament related to members of the Herodian family. The post Herod the Great and the Herodian Family Tree appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society. […]

  • A non-binary warrior in medieval Scandinavia?
    by Medievalists.net on September 23, 2021 at 5:00 am

    The modern re-analysis of a grave found in Finland over 50 years ago is challenging the traditional beliefs about gender roles in medieval Scandinavia. […]

  • How gunpowder changed in the Middle Ages
    by Medievalists.net on September 23, 2021 at 3:45 am

    Researchers have recreated medieval gunpowder recipes and analyzed the energies released during combustion, revealing that the evolution of the perfect powder was a slow, trial-and-error process. […]

  • Christians and Jews in 13th-century England, with Adrienne Williams Boyarin
    by Medievalists.net on September 23, 2021 at 2:59 am

    This week on The Medieval Podcast, Danièle speaks with Adrienne Williams Boyarin about the ways in which Christians and Jews dealt with similarity and difference in thirteenth-century England. […]

  • Mass grave of crusaders discovered in Lebanon
    by Medievalists.net on September 22, 2021 at 7:15 pm

    A new study has revealed details about the remains of 25 soldiers from two mass graves discovered within the dry moat of Sidon Castle, Lebanon. […]

  • Milestones: Bert de Vries (1939-2021)
    by BAS Staff on September 22, 2021 at 4:05 am

    On March 28, Bert de Vries, long time director of the Umm al Jimal excavations in Jordan and former director of the American Center of […] The post Milestones: Bert de Vries (1939-2021) appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society. […]

  • The Kingdom of Cush
    by Jennifer Drummond on September 21, 2021 at 10:55 pm

    The Kingdom of Cush, Egypt’s neighbor to the south, played an important role in biblical history despite being one of the lesser known kingdoms. According to 2 Kings 19:9, “Tirhakah, King of Cush” came to the aid of Hezekiah against Sennacherib, king of Assyria, when his forces laid siege to Jerusalem in 701 B.C.E. Without such aid, Judah would have likely gone the way of the Kingdom of Israel—spread to the four winds, never to return. […]

  • The Kingdom of Cush
    by Jennifer Drummond on September 21, 2021 at 10:55 pm

    The Kingdom of Cush, Egypt’s neighbor to the south, played an important role in biblical history despite being one of the lesser known kingdoms. According to 2 Kings 19:9, “Tirhakah, King of Cush” came to the aid of Hezekiah against Sennacherib, king of Assyria, when his forces laid siege to Jerusalem in 701 B.C.E. Without such aid, Judah would have likely gone the way of the Kingdom of Israel—spread to the four winds, never to return. […]

  • Medieval Noir Mystery series to come to an end with its 15th novel
    by Medievalists.net on September 21, 2021 at 7:52 pm

    Jeri Westerson is known for her critically acclaimed Crispin Guest Medieval Noir Mystery novels, and the final book in that series — The Deadliest Sin — will be released this December. […]

  • Was Jesus’ Last Supper a Seder?
    by Biblical Archaeology Society Staff on September 21, 2021 at 3:18 pm

    Many assume that Jesus' Last Supper was a Seder, the ritual Passover meal. Examine evidence from the synoptic Gospels with scholar Jonathan Klawans. The post Was Jesus’ Last Supper a Seder? appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society. […]

  • Qumran’s True Purpose Discovered?
    by Michele Barasso on September 20, 2021 at 5:13 am

    Archaeologists have long puzzled over the exact function of Khirbet Qumran—the famous site located next to the caves where the Dead Sea Scrolls were found—since […] The post Qumran’s True Purpose Discovered? appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society. […]

  • Laughter, Satire and Medieval Parody
    by Medievalists.net on September 20, 2021 at 3:56 am

    What made medieval people laugh? In. this episode of the Medieval Grad Podcast, Lucie talks with Bryant Whit […]

  • History of Science journal goes open access
    by Medievalists.net on September 20, 2021 at 12:07 am

    Centaurus: Journal of the European Society for the History of Science will be fully Open Acces starting in 2022. […]

  • Book production and circulation from Antiquity to the Middle Ages
    by Medievalists.net on September 19, 2021 at 8:32 pm

    Three episodes will lead us from the Classical Age to Late Antiquity, and then to the Middle Ages, illustrating the powers that can steer the success of a literary piece, and, sometimes, determine its fate. […]

  • Crafting Communities: Masons in Medieval London
    by Medievalists.net on September 19, 2021 at 6:46 pm

    A look at how misteries, guilds and fraternities worked to create a sense of community for the masons of medieval London. […]

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