History

  • Pan: Purveyor of Music and Panic
    by Mary Harrsch on December 4, 2020 at 6:32 pm

     In Greek mythology, Syrinx was a forest Nymph. In her attempt to escape the affection of the god Pan (god of the wild, shephers, and flocks with the hindquarters, legs and horns of a goat), she was transformed into a water-reed or calamos (cane-reed). Then, Pan cut several reeds, placed them in parallel one next to the other, and bound them together to make a melodic musical instrument. Ancient Greeks called this instrument Syrinx, in […]

  • Manuscripts of Middle English literature go online
    by Medievalists.net on December 4, 2020 at 4:12 pm

    Key manuscripts of Middle English literature have been digitised and made available online by the University of Manchester. They include works such as Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales and John Lydgate‘s Troy Book and Fall of Princes. […]

  • Eunuchs in the Bible
    by Megan Sauter on December 4, 2020 at 3:00 pm

    Stephen J. Patterson discusses what Jesus meant when he referred to “eunuchs who have made themselves eunuchs for the sake of the kingdom of heaven” (Matthew 19:11–12). The post Eunuchs in the Bible appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society. […]

  • Before WWI, Trench Fever Plagued the Ancient Romans and Napoleonic Soldiers
    on December 4, 2020 at 12:30 pm

    Long associated with the Great War, the disease actually dates back at least 2,000 years, a new study suggests […]

  • British Library acquires 15th century psalter
    by Medievalists.net on December 4, 2020 at 1:04 am

    The British Library has acquired the Lucas Psalter, a copy of the Psalms dating from the second half of the 15th century. The library plans to digitise the manuscript and make it available online. […]

  • Early 17th century Japanese document details castle-building project
    by Medievalists.net on December 4, 2020 at 12:48 am

    An early Edo period document stipulating the Hosokawa clan code of conduct for vassals dispatched on a national project to rebuild Sunpu Castle has been discovered by Kumamoto University researchers. […]

  • Manuscripts, databases, and the joys of Byzantine literature, with Dave Jenkins
    by Medievalists.net on December 4, 2020 at 12:11 am

    A conversation with Dave Jenkins about how we read (and how to enjoy) Byzantine literature, from digitized manuscripts and online databases to the pleasures of Byzantine prose. […]

  • Altar to Ancient Greek God Pan Found Embedded in Wall of Byzantine Church
    on December 3, 2020 at 8:11 pm

    Christians in what is now northern Israel may have repurposed the basalt structure as a deliberate affront to pagan worshippers […]

  • Telling Stories, Saving Lives: The Sultana Who Saved a Kingdom through her Stories
    by Medievalists.net on December 3, 2020 at 6:54 pm

    Scheherazade, the heroine of The Tales of the 1001 Nights, saved her world through stories. […]

  • Living in Ancient Judah
    by Jonathan Laden on December 3, 2020 at 4:18 am

    A new virtual exhibition, Daily Life in an Ancient Judean Town, has been announced by the Badè Museum of Biblical Archaeology. It promises to cover […] The post Living in Ancient Judah appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society. […]

  • Living in Ancient Judah
    by Jonathan Laden on December 3, 2020 at 4:18 am

    A new virtual exhibition, Daily Life in an Ancient Judean Town, has been announced by the Badè Museum of Biblical Archaeology. It promises to cover […] The post Living in Ancient Judah appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society. […]

  • New Medieval Books: Knights, Ladies and Pigs
    by Medievalists.net on December 2, 2020 at 8:30 pm

    Five new publications about the Middle Ages - which one would you read? […]

  • Ancient origins of the griffin
    by Mary Harrsch on December 2, 2020 at 7:32 pm

     A legendary creature with the body, tail, and back legs of a lion, the head and wings of an eagle, and, sometimes, an eagle's talons as its front feet first appears in ancient Iranian and Egyptian art dating back to before 3000 BCE.  In Egypt, a griffin-like animal can be seen on a cosmetic palette from Hierakonpolis, known as the "Two Dog Palette", dated to 3300–3100 BCE. The divine storm-bird, Anzu, half man and half bird, […]

  • In the Ancient American Southwest, Turkeys Were Friends, Not Food
    on December 2, 2020 at 6:07 pm

    An 800-year-old blanket made out of turkey feathers testifies to the bird's significance in Pueblo cultur […]

  • Mary, Simeon or Anna: Who First Recognized Jesus as Messiah?
    by Biblical Archaeology Society Staff on December 2, 2020 at 2:55 pm

    Who was the first person to truly recognize Jesus as the messiah and understand the implications? Biblical scholar Ben Witherington III takes a close look at the account given in Luke, and sheds some light on what the Biblical narrative has to say about who was the first to recognize Jesus as the messiah. The post Mary, Simeon or Anna: Who First Recognized Jesus as Messiah? appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society. […]

  • Study Rewrites History of Ancient Land Bridge Between Britain and Europe
    on December 2, 2020 at 12:30 pm

    New research suggests that climate change, not a tsunami, doomed the now-submerged territory of Doggerland […]

  • Tens of Thousands of 12,000-Year-Old Rock Paintings Found in Colombia
    on December 1, 2020 at 6:17 pm

    The images—heralded by researchers as "the Sistine Chapel of the ancients"—depict animals, humans and geometric patterns […]

  • The dark side of early Saturnalia
    by Mary Harrsch on December 1, 2020 at 6:17 pm

      Give to others readily, and cherish good hopes.  Marcus Aurelius. Meditations. Book 1.Image: Month of December from the Chronography of 354 with Saturnalian dice on the table and a mask (oscilla) hanging above by the 4th century CE calligrapher Filocalus.  Although Saturnalia is usually remembered for festivities, gift giving, and, in the ancient Roman world, role reversal between slaves and their masters, there was a less […]

  • Were Mary and Joseph Married or Engaged at Jesus’ Birth?
    by Mark Wilson on December 1, 2020 at 1:55 pm

    Were Mary and Joseph married or engaged when they traveled to Bethlehem? Biblical scholar Mark Wilson examines what the gospels say in this Bible History Daily guest post. The post Were Mary and Joseph Married or Engaged at Jesus’ Birth? appeared first on Biblical Archaeology Society. […]

  • Margaret Tudor, Paleography, and the Scots Language, with Helen Newsome
    by Medievalists.net on November 30, 2020 at 7:28 pm

    Kate Buchanan is joined by Helen Newsome to discuss Helen’s journey to studying medieval Scottish history, her work on Margaret Tudor’s letters, and […]

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