Ancient History

Participants masked up at Abel Beth Maacah

Nava Panitz-Cohen and Naama Yahalom-Mack of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Robert Mullins of Azusa Pacific University direct excavations at Abel Beth Maacah in northern Israel. Despite some hurdles, their team conduced a small excavation in 2020 and hope for a 2021 season as well.

They answered five questions about the pandemic’s effect on their excavation.

Participants masked up at Abel Beth Maacah, in 2020. From left to right are Hebrew University [...]

Sun, Apr 11, 2021
Source: Biblical Archeology Daily

The Visigoths were an early Germanic people who, along with the Ostrogoths, constituted the two major political entities of the Goths within the Roman Empire in Late Antiquity, or what is known as the Migration Period. The Visigoths emerged from earlier Gothic groups, including a large group of Thervingi, who had moved into the Roman Empire beginning in 376 CE and had played a major role in defeating the Romans at the Battle of Adrianople [...]

Sun, Apr 11, 2021
Source: Ancient Times

Carbonized raisins from Iron Age I (12th to 11th centuries B.C.) Shiloh were published by Israel Finkelstein in BAR in 1986.

Seeds and fruit remains are exciting discoveries for archaeologists. Not only do they provide clues about ancient agriculture and diets, they can also provide radiocarbon data to help date buried strata.

Fruit also plays an important role in the Biblical narrative. If Eve had not eaten [...]

Sun, Apr 11, 2021
Source: Ancient Cultures
jesus-last-supper

Was Jesus a Jew? Some people claim that Jesus was a Christian. Some have claimed that he was an Aryan Christian. But in recent decades scholars have been returning to ancient historical settings and discovering the Jewish Jesus. Anthony J. Saldarini’s Bible Review article “What Price the Uniqueness of Jesus?” cautions against wrenching Jesus out of his Jewish world.

Was Jesus a Jew? This late-15th-century painting by the Spanish artist known as the Master [...]

Sat, Apr 10, 2021
Source: Biblical Archeology Daily

Julia Domna was born in Emesa (present-day Homs) in Roman Syria, the youngest daughter of the high priest of Baal, Julius Bassianus. The family had enormous wealth and was promoted to Roman senatorial aristocracy. Before her marriage, Domna also inherited the estate of her paternal great-uncle, Julius Agrippa, a former leading centurion. 

In 187 CE, she married Severus, who at the time was governor of the Roman province of Gallia Lugdunensis. The Augustan History relates that, [...]

Sat, Apr 10, 2021
Source: Ancient Times

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