Ancient History

The term Ancient Chinese Philosophy is generally understood to refer to the belief systems developed by various philosophers during the era known as the Hundred Schools of Thought (also The Contention of the Hundred Schools of Thought) when these thinkers formed their own schools during the Spring and Autumn Period (c. 772-476 BCE) and the Warring States Period (c. 481-221 BCE) after the Zhou Dynasty... [...]
Mon, Jul 06, 2020
Source: Ancient History Encyclopedia
Today, I started listening to Mary Beard's "Fires of Vesuvius: Pompeii Lost and Found" and Professor Beard brought up something I had not considered when thinking about the skeletal remains found in cubiculum (c) of the House of the Prince of Naples. Professor Beard pointed out that the discovery of skeletal remains was highly sought after by early royal visitors to the excavations in Pompeii. I had thought about the motivation of [...]
Sun, Jul 05, 2020
Source: Ancient Times
Yesterday, I finished listening to the Great Courses lecture series, Books That Matter: The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire presented by Professor Leo Damrosch of Harvard (I listen to audiobooks while I exercise!). Although Professor Damrosch summarizes the content of the actual volumes, he is more focused on analyzing the lifestyle and Enlightenment thinking of Edward Gibbon and those he associated with as he wrote the great [...]
Sun, Jul 05, 2020
Source: Ancient Times
Opened in June 2018, the Musée de la Romanité is adjacent to the famous Arena of Nîmes, an imposing Roman amphitheater built in the 1st century CE and one the world's best-preserved examples of Roman architecture. Founded by the Romans in the 1st century BCE with the name of Colonia Nemausus, Nîmes quickly achieved importance during the Roman Empire for its strategic position halfway along the Via Domitia that connected Italy and Spain. The [...]
Sun, Jul 05, 2020
Source: Ancient Times

“In the fifth year of King Rehoboam, King Shishak of Egypt marched against Jerusalem.”
—1 Kings 14:25

Shishak, actually Pharaoh Sheshonq I, left his own account of this northern campaign carved into the walls of the Temple of Karnak in Egypt, but he does not mention Jerusalem among the places he conquered. Israeli scholar Yigal Levin's article “Did Pharaoh Sheshonq Attack Jerusalem” in the July/August 2012 issue of Biblical [...]

Sun, Jul 05, 2020
Source: Ancient Cultures

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