Ancient History

The staurogram combines the Greek letters tau-rho to stand in for parts of the Greek words for “cross” (stauros) and “crucify” (stauroō) in Bodmer papyrus P75. Staurograms serve as the earliest images of Jesus on the cross, predating other Christian crucifixion imagery by 200 years. Photo: Foundation Martin Bodmer.

How and when did Christians start to depict images of Jesus on the cross? Some believe the early church avoided [...]

Sun, Apr 14, 2019
Source: Biblical Archeology Daily

Throughout the world, images of the cross adorn the walls and steeples of churches. For some Christians, the cross is part of their daily attire worn around their necks. Sometimes the cross even adorns the body of a Christian in permanent ink. In Egypt, among other countries, for example, Christians wear a tattoo of the cross on their wrists. And for some Christians, each year during the [...]

Sat, Apr 13, 2019
Source: Biblical Archeology Daily

Sir Thomas Malory (c. 1415-1471 CE) was an English knight during the War of the Roses (1455-1487 CE) best known for his highly influential work of medieval literature, Le Morte D'Arthur regarded as the first novel in English, the first in western literature, and the most comprehensive treatment of the Arthurian Legend. Malory wrote the book while in prison for various crimes (real or imagined... [...]
Fri, Apr 12, 2019
Source: Ancient History Encyclopedia
yael-gentileschi

Deborah, the only female judge in the Bible, excelled in multiple areas.1 Clearly one of the Bible's most outstanding figures, she served ancient Israel as a prophet,2 judge, military leader, songwriter, and minstrel (Judges 4–5).

The only woman who judges, Deborah “used to sit under the palm tree…and the sons of Israel came up to her for judgment” (Judges 4:5). She is shown here in a stained glass window by the Russian-Jewish artist [...]

Fri, Apr 12, 2019
Source: Biblical Archeology Daily

Djenne-Djenno (aka Djenné-Jeno, Jenne-Jeno, or Old Jenne) was an ancient city located in modern Mali, West Africa which flourished between c. 250 BCE - 1100 CE, making it one of the oldest cities in Sub-Saharan Africa. Prospering thanks to fertile agricultural land and as a hub of regional trade, the city boasted a population of around 20,000 at its peak. Djenne-Djenno, along with its medieval... [...]
Fri, Apr 12, 2019
Source: Ancient History Encyclopedia

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