Ancient History

The keep, located within a courtyard and surrounded by a curtain wall, was the heart of a medieval castle. The hall keep was a low building while the tower keep or donjon could have three or more floors and be topped by turrets and battlements. With its extra thick walls and protected entrance, the keep was generally the safest place in a castle during the siege warfare of the 11th and 12th century... [...]
Thu, Jun 14, 2018
Source: Ancient History Encyclopedia

Information and communication technologies (ICT) are revolutionizing the ways in which the public interacts, understands, and appreciates the importance of cultural heritage around the world. They are additionally enabling sustainable tourism to flourish in an era of unprecedented globalization. In this interview, James Blake Wiener of Ancient History Encyclopedia speaks to Professor Lorenzo Cantoni... [...]
Wed, Jun 13, 2018
Source: Ancient History Encyclopedia

English medieval knights wore metal armour of iron or steel to protect themselves from archers and the long swords of opponents. From the 9th century CE, chain mail suits gave protection and freedom of movement until solid plate armour became more common in the 14th century CE. A crested helmet, shield with a striking coat of arms, and a liveried horse completed a costly outfit which was designed... [...]
Wed, Jun 13, 2018
Source: Ancient History Encyclopedia

Located at the easternmost point of the Hawaiian Islands, Cape Kumukahi holds a special place in ancient Hawaiian mythology as this was where the gods and goddesses first arrived in the islands from Tahiti. It was here that the fire goddess, Pele, unleashed her wrath upon the mythical figure Kumukahi, the man after whom the cape is named. And, most importantly, it was where a sacred but little-known heiau... [...]
Tue, Jun 12, 2018
Source: Ancient History Encyclopedia
seals-of-isaiah-and-king-hezekiah-discovered

This summer, come face to face with ancient relics associated with Biblical figures. Now on view through August 19, 2018, the exhibit Seals of Isaiah and King Hezekiah Discovered presents two seal impressions (bullae) found 3 feet apart in the Ophel excavations led by archaeologist Eilat Mazar at the foot of Jersualem's Temple Mount. The exhibit can be seen at the Armstrong Auditorium on the campus of Herbert W. Armstrong College [...]

Tue, Jun 12, 2018
Source: Biblical Archeology Daily

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