Ancient History

Samhain (pronounced “SOW-in” or “SAH-win”), was a festival celebrated by the ancient Celts halfway between the autumn equinox and the winter solstice. It began at dusk around October 31st and likely lasted three days. Samhain marked the transition between the year's lighter and darker halves and was celebrated throughout the ancient Celtic communities of Europe, including... [...]
Mon, Sep 28, 2020
Source: Ancient History Encyclopedia

Author Wendy Orr (famous for Nim's Island, which has been turned into a motion picture) has created a captivating narrative aimed at young adults. The protagonist in Swallow's Dance is Leira, daughter of the high priestess on the Aegean island of Thera (modern-day Santorini). Throughout the story, we learn about the customs and culture of the Bronze Age Aegean, with a focus... [...]
Mon, Sep 28, 2020
Source: Ancient History Encyclopedia

Often when I am looking for images of ancient people or events I encounter art, usually medieval, with ancient people dressed anachronistically in medieval clothing. This morning, however, I happened across a wall painting from a synagogue in Dura Europos dated to 250 CE clearly depicting soldiers in chain mail at the battle of Eben Ezer between the Israelites and the Philistines as retold in the Book of Samuel. The Philistines inhabited the [...]

Sun, Sep 27, 2020
Source: Ancient Times
Digs Map 2014 PN

Cornell University professor Lauren Monroe from the second season of excavation at Abel Beth Maacah, directed by Robert A. Mullins and Nava Panitz-Cohen.

Situated at the ancient border between the polities of Israel, Aram and Phoenicia, and the modern countries of Israel, Lebanon and Syria, the large tell of Abel Beth Maacah holds tremendous promise, both for understanding the history of this multi-cultural arena, as well [...]

Sun, Sep 27, 2020
Source: Biblical Archeology Daily

Prior to the Republican period, Rome depended on their non-citizen allies to provide, train, and equip cavalry known as the Foederati. But, when the Republic transitioned into the Empire, Augustus created a regular Auxilia corps. Although still non-citizens, these troops were now a regular part of the Roman army that were paid and trained by the Roman State. A typical cavalryman of an ala would be paid 20 percent more than a typical citizen [...]

Sat, Sep 26, 2020
Source: Ancient Times

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