Ancient History

klawans

Many people still assume that Jesus' Last Supper was a Seder, a ritual meal held in celebration of the Jewish holiday of Passover. In this exclusive guest post, Boston University Professor of Religion Jonathan Klawans provides an update to his popular Bible Review article questioning this common assumption. This post was originally published in Bible History Daily in 2016.—Ed.

Every spring, as the Boston snow begins to melt, the emails start coming [...]

Fri, Apr 19, 2019
Source: Biblical Archeology Daily
klawans-seder-passover

Read Jonathan Klawans's article “Was Jesus' Last Supper a Seder?” as it originally appeared in Bible Review, October 2001. Klawans also wrote a follow-up article, “Jesus' Last Supper Still Wasn't a Passover Seder Meal.”—Ed.

Traditional Views of Jesus' Last Supper as a Passover Meal

With his disciples gathered around him, Jesus partakes of his Last Supper. The meal in this late-15th-century painting by the Spanish artist known only as the Master of Perea [...]

Fri, Apr 19, 2019
Source: Biblical Archeology Daily

Passover is a Jewish festival celebrated since at least the 5th century BCE, typically associated with the tradition of Moses leading the Israelites out of Egypt. According to historical evidence and modern-day practice, the festival was originally celebrated on the 14th of Nissan. Directly after Passover is the Festival of Unleavened Bread, which most traditions describe as originating when the... [...]
Fri, Apr 19, 2019
Source: Ancient History Encyclopedia

Eros was the Greek god of love, or more precisely, passionate and physical desire. Without warning he selects his targets and forcefully strikes at their hearts, bringing confusion and irrepressible feelings or, in the words of Hesiod, he ‘loosens the limbs and weakens the mind' (Theogony, 120). Eros is most often represented in Greek art as a carefree and beautiful... [...]
Thu, Apr 18, 2019
Source: Ancient History Encyclopedia
pillow-shaped-ingot

A team of underwater archaeologists recently found the remains of an ancient shipwreck just off Turkey's southern coast in the western Bay of Antalya. Underwater investigations of the region are sponsored by Turkey's Ministry of Culture and date back to 1999. The discovery, recently made public in the latest volume of Palestine Exploration Quarterly, constitutes one of the oldest Bronze Age shipwrecks yet found in the Mediterranean and offers new insights [...]

Thu, Apr 18, 2019
Source: Ancient Cultures

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