Ancient History

This nobly restrained composite statue depicts a virtuous Roman matron of a distinguished family. She is commemorated as both a chaste wife and mother of children, and her portrait celebrates marriage as an enduring value and symbol of Roman life. This figure provides a notable contrast with the DMA's luxuriant Roman portrait head of a youth (1984.163) in both style and character. Whereas the boy exudes exuberant youth with his active gaze and foppish [...]

Tue, Aug 11, 2020
Source: Ancient Times

The Despotate of the Morea was a semi-autonomous appanage of the later Byzantine Empire. The Byzantines retook part of the Peloponnese in Southern Greece in 1262 CE, but the Morea was only officially governed by semi-autonomous despots of the imperial Kantakouzenos and Palaiologos families starting in 1349 CE. The Despotate of the Morea would end up outlasting the Byzantine Empire itself, and the... [...]
Tue, Aug 11, 2020
Source: Ancient History Encyclopedia
Rachel Kalisher at Ashkelon Expedition

The bones don't lie: The Philistines had European ancestry. A new study published in Science Advances analyzes DNA extracted from ten people buried during the second and first millennia B.C.E. at the site of Ashkelon on the Mediterranean Sea. It shows that the inhabitants of Ashkelon during the Iron Age I (c. 1200–1000 B.C.E.)—the Philistines—had DNA with a significantly larger amount of European ancestry than the site's earlier and later inhabitants.

Rachel Kalisher, a member [...]

Tue, Aug 11, 2020
Source: Biblical Archeology Daily

Greeks were aware of Egyptian deities, including Isis, at least as early as the Archaic Period (c. 700–480 BCE), and her first known temple in Greece was built during or before the fourth century BCE by Egyptians living in Athens. The conquests of Alexander the Great late in that century created Hellenistic kingdoms around the Mediterranean and Near East, including Ptolemaic Egypt, and put Greek and non-Greek religions in much closer contact. The resulting diffusion [...]

Mon, Aug 10, 2020
Source: Ancient Times

The Despotate of Epirus was one of the successor states of the Byzantine Empire when it disintegrated following the Fourth Crusade's capture of Constantinople in 1204 CE. It was originally the most successful of those successor states, coming close to recapturing Constantinople, but after 1230 CE, it was geographically limited to Epirus itself and occasionally the neighboring territories... [...]
Mon, Aug 10, 2020
Source: Ancient History Encyclopedia

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