Ancient History

Orbe-Boscéaz, also named Boscéay, is an archaeological site in Switzerland, located at the territory of the town of Orbe (Vaud). It includes a vast Roman villa measuring over 200 m long comprised of about 100 rooms, some heated by hypocaust, colonnaded porticoes, and ornamental ponds.  Nine of the rooms featured intricate mosaics depicting gods, trompe l’œil geometric shapes or figurative scenes of Greek mythology, such as the famous labyrinth of Theseus and the Minotaur.

Excavations have [...]

Mon, Apr 19, 2021
Source: Ancient Times

Pets in Colonial America were kept by the colonists for the same reasons they were in Europe: for companionship and, in the case of dogs, for protection, hunting, and herding. Cats controlled vermin in homes and barns until the 18th century when they became valued as house pets. The colonists kept many different animals as pets, however, including squirrels, wild birds, raccoons, deer, horses, snakes... [...]
Mon, Apr 19, 2021
Source: Ancient History Encyclopedia

Sir William Wallace (c. 1270-1305) was a Scottish knight and national hero who fought for his country's independence from England. Wallace famously led an army to victory at the Battle of Stirling Bridge in September 1297. The English king Edward I of England (r. 1272-1307) was intent on revenge and conquering Scotland, but his victory at Falkirk against Wallace in 1298 could not ultimately subdue... [...]
Mon, Apr 19, 2021
Source: Ancient History Encyclopedia

Ruins of the outer wall and the “Damascus Gate” at Ebla. Ebla was an important trading empire throughout the 3rd millennium B.C.E. until it was destroyed during the 23rd century B.C.E. At its height, Ebla controlled an area roughly half the size of modern Syria. Ebla’s vast trading network is evidence from artifacts from Sumer, Cyprus, Egypt, and as far as Afghanistan have been recovered from the city’s palaces.
Credit: Mappo, [...]

Sun, Apr 18, 2021
Source: Ancient Cultures

All Greek and Etruscan metal rings with engraved bezels ultimately derive from Egyptian and Phoenician cartouche-shaped rings. The cartouche-shaped ring was especially popular in Etruria in the later 500s B.C., where immigrant Greek goldsmiths from Ionia introduced it.

This example features an intricate scene of two men approaching a fountain where water gushes into a vessel from a lion's head spout. Behind the fountain, a man squats as if hiding, holding a sword. These details identify [...]

Sun, Apr 18, 2021
Source: Ancient Times

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