Historical

Archaeologists excavating the remains of a Neolithic village in the South Caucasus about 20 miles south of Tblisi, Georgia, have discovered the earliest evidence of winemaking in the world. An internation team from the University of Toronto and the Georgian National Museum have been exploring two Early Ceramic Neolithic (6000-4500 B.C.) sites, Gadachrili Gora and Shulaveris Gora, and sent fragment of ceramic jars unearthed at the sites to specialists at [...]

Tue, Nov 14, 2017
Source: The History Blog
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The remains of a 4,500-year-old temple in Peru's pre-Incan Ventarrón archaeological complex was devastated by fire on November 12th. As estimated 95% of the temple complex has suffered heavy damage as high winds fanned the flames faster than the archaeologists on site and the firefighters could contain them. One of the walls of the temple was decorated with a gripping mural of a dear being caught in a net. At [...]

Mon, Nov 13, 2017
Source: The History Blog

A portrait of Admiral Horatio Nelson depicting his war wounds in all their unvarnished glory has been rediscovered after 100 years out of public view and knowledge in private collections. It will go on display at Philip Mould & Company's Pall Mall gallery starting November 13th. To celebrate its return, it will be displayed next to meticulous replicas of the fanciest accessories depicted in the painting: Admiral Nelson's iconic bicorne [...]

Sun, Nov 12, 2017
Source: The History Blog

Conservators have discovered the body of a definitely deceased grasshopper resting in disarticulated peace among Vincent van Gogh's Olive Trees. Mary Shafter at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Missouri, was examining the work under a microscope as part of a research project for the upcoming catalogue of the museum's collection of 104 French paintings when she spotted the little guy entombed in the deadly embrace of van [...]

Sat, Nov 11, 2017
Source: The History Blog

The Frans Hals Museum in Haarlem, northwest Netherlands, will tickle visitors' funny bones with an exhibition dedicated to depictions of laughter in the paintings of Dutch Golden Age masters. The Art of Laughter: Humour in in the Golden Age is the first museum exhibition to treat the subject of hilarity in 17th century artworks with the seriousness it deserves. It's the first show to focus on the topic at all, [...]

Fri, Nov 10, 2017
Source: The History Blog

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