Muhammad Ali, larger than life

An unsurpassed legacy has reached its temporal conclusion.  The greatest sports figure and celebrity of the 20th century has passed.  Rather than mourn his death, we continue to celebrate his life and its many facets.   Rather than poorly retelling a complex life story, I chose some amusing images that touch on the breadth of his celebrity.  You know you’re famous when: Andy Warhol comes to your home to snap a pic, you spar with Elvis…

Muhammad Ali, one of the world’s greatest boxers, died on Friday, June 3, at the age of 74.

Born Cassius Marcellus Clay on January 17, 1942, in Louisville, Kentucky, Ali started boxing at age 12 — and ultimately became known for much more than just his successful boxing career.

Ali converted to Islam in 1964, changing his name from Cassius Clay — what he called his “slave name” — to Muhammed Ali after becoming affiliated with the Nation of Islam. His political activism and charity inspired millions throughout his life.

Please visit his site at muhammadali.com!  It is a rare, exceptional, site worthy of its namesake.

Fame started with the 1960 Olympics…

Muhammad Ali, then Cassius Clay, represented the United States in the 1960 Olympics in Rome. He defeated Soviet boxer Gennady Schatkov as part of his gold-medal performance. Bettmann/Getty Images

 

Young heavyweight fighter Ali, then Clay, is seen training at City Parks Gym in New York on Feb. 8, 1962. Dan Grossi/AP Photo

 

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1967, with Wilt Chamberlain. AP
1967, with Johnny Carson, star of NBC-TV’s ‘Tonight’ show, in New York City. AP

 

with Bob Dylan

 

1971, having his photo taken by Andy Warhol in Deer Lake, Pennsylvania. AP

 

1971, taunting Joe Frazier at Frazier’s training headquarters in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Getty John Shearer/The LIFE Picture Collection

 

1985, with Liberace and Hulk Hogan in New York City. AP Marty Lederhandler

 

1997, with Prince in Washington, D.C. AP Karen Cooper

 

with President Ronald Regan

with Malcom X

 

with The King

 

with part of The Jackson Five, Micheal Jackson claims victory

 



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