Frida Kahlo, Animated Portrait

An inspired animation of Frida Kahlo’s famous portrait that was taken by her father, Guillermo Kahlo, in 1932 .  The animation incorporates key images from her works that also defined her life as she depicted it on canvas.  I had to have it.

Frida Kahlo, animated portrait
Frida Kahlo, animated portrait

 

via GIPHY

Frida Kahlo Bio as Artist

“Mexican fantasy painter known as much for her turbulent personal life as her fanciful self-portraits. Kahlo learned to paint in 1925 after recovering from a debilitating bus accident that left her unable to bear children. The tragedy was often the subject of her paintings and was an integral part of her personal imagery. Her work can be seen as the product of a kind of exorcism by which she projected her anguish on to another Frida, in order to free herself from pain and at the same time maintain a hold of reality. Small in scale, primitive in style, and bold in color, the artist is sometimes shown as an animal, such a deer, which have lead artists and critics alike to label her work Surrealist. The artist eschewed this, maintaining that she painted images from her own life, not dreams. Also the subject of several works was her tumultuous marriage to artist Diego Rivera. One portrait shows the artist as a tiny figure in traditional Mexican dress, dwarfed in size by the large, brooding Rivera. In 1953, Kahlo’s leg was amputated at the knee due to gangrene. She subsequently turned to drugs and alcohol to relieve her suffering. She died almost certainly by suicide in 1954. Her work received notoriety in the 1970’s, becoming popular with feminist art historians and Latin Americans living in the United States” – via MoMA

 

Masterpieces

Frida Kahlo spent the majority of her life confined to a bed and in physical pain.  She painted her small world in graphic and sometimes gruesome detail.  Her work was and still is labeled as Surrealism, which she strongly rejected.  So, I applied another label I found, Magic Realism.  The first painting, below, is her first of many future self-portraits.  The bottom 3 paintings represent some of her greatest works.  All of the images are Courtesy of www.FridaKahlo.org.

Self-Portrait in a Velvet Dress, 1926 by Frida Kahlo. Her first self-portrait. Courtesy of www.FridaKahlo.org

 

Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird, 1940 by Frida Kahlo. Courtesy of www.FridaKahlo.org

 

Roots, 1943 by Frida Kahlo. Courtesy of www.FridaKahlo.org

 

The Broken Column, 1944 by Frida Kahlo. Courtesy of www.FridaKahlo.org