Bob and Al

Allen Ginsberg dropping by Bob Dylan’s house in Woodstock.

20130710-065317.jpg

These two artists are at the top among the most influential people of the 20th century.  Cultural icons, profound visionaries, great men of words and conviction. ~me

Bob Dylan has been described as one of the most influential figures of the 20th century, musically and culturally. He was included in the Time 100: The Most Important People of the Century where he was called “master poet, caustic social critic and intrepid, guiding spirit of the counterculture generation”. President Barack Obama said of Dylan in 2012, “There is not a bigger giant in the history of American music.” Biographer Howard Sounes placed him among the most exalted company when he said, “There are giant figures in art who are sublimely good—MozartPicassoFrank Lloyd WrightShakespeareDickens. Dylan ranks alongside these artists.” Rolling Stone magazine ranked Dylan at Number Two in their 2011 list of  “100 Greatest Artists” of all time.  – wiki

The Beat Generation

Irwin Allen Ginsberg (June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997) was an American poet and one of the leading figures of the Beat Generation in the 1950s. He vigorously opposed militarismeconomic materialism and sexual repression. Ginsberg is best known for his epic poem “Howl“, in which he denounced what he saw as the destructive forces of capitalism and conformity in the United States.

Ginsberg was a practising Buddhist who studied Eastern religious disciplines extensively. He lived a modest life.

In Ginsberg’s freshman year at Columbia he met fellow undergraduate Lucien Carr, who introduced him to a number of future Beat writers, including Jack KerouacWilliam S. Burroughs, and John Clellon Holmes. They bonded because they saw in one another an excitement about the potential of American youth, a potential that existed outside the strict conformist confines of post–World War II, McCarthy-era America.

In 1957, “Howl” attracted widespread publicity when it became the subject of an obscenity trial, as it depicted heterosexual and homosexual sex at a time when sodomy laws made homosexual acts a crime in every U.S. state.  Judge Clayton W. Horn ruled that “Howl” was not obscene, adding,

“Would there be any freedom of press or speech if one must reduce his vocabulary to vapid innocuous euphemisms?”  ~ Judge Clayton W. Horn

His collection The Fall of America shared the annual U.S. National Book Award for Poetry in 1974. In 1979 he received the National Arts Club gold medal and was inducted into the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters. Ginsberg was a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 1995 for his book Cosmopolitan Greetings: Poems 1986–1992.  – wiki

Leave a Reply